The Dangers of Antibiotics

Winter is here and many bacterial infections start to knock on the door more often than we would like to. They are painful, uncomfortable, and should not be underestimated. Usually, the conventional treatment of these conditions includes antibiotics. Unfortunately, these medications have a really bad reputation, and maybe they really deserve it! Why should we be more careful with antibiotic treatments?

Why should we be cautious with antibiotics?
There is no doubt that antibiotics have been helping people recover from serious (even life threatening)

dangers of antibiotic treatment

Antibiotics should be taken responsibly.

infections in their bodies. The problem these days comes from the consequences of using these medications for cases, which do not require them. An excellent example is when we take antibiotics when we have flu in order to prevent ourselves from a possible infection. Some folks even think that these meds will help them recover from the cold more rapidly. However, it turns out that the disease runs its course with the same duration. And that’s not all, you may find that soon after you recover from the flu, you become sick again. Is that a coincidence? Definitely, not! It has been proven that antibiotics damage our natural defense mechanisms. I don’t know if you are aware that more than 80% of our immune system is located in the intestines. Now it makes perfect sense why taking antibiotics causes many abdominal issues (such as diarrhea). These medications actually destroy our beneficial colon bacteria and afterwards they leave our body more susceptible to diseases.

Antibiotic Resistance

But that’s not the whole problem. There is one more scary detail about using too much antibiotics from more and more people all over the world. The bacteria we try to kill, starts to evolve with every single year, which means that very soon the antibiotics we take won’t be effective. In severe cases of infections, when we need such medications, they won’t work. I don’t want to scare anyone, but this dreadful

dangers of antibiotics

Antibiotic resistance is a real future threat.

tendency has been confirmed by medical experts like England’s Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies and the researchers from The Wellcome Trust (the organization, which conducted the research showing the bacteria’s reaction to antibiotics). There is one more sad news, even if you don’t usually take (or if you have never taken) antibiotics, the antibiotic resistance still affects you. Why is that? Because the problem does not come from the medications themselves, but from the bacteria. They are smart enough to evolve in order to survive.  So, if we continue to use antibiotics uncontrollably, we will create superbacteria, which cannot be treated with current medications. So, there is a high chance in the future, when we have a health emergency which requires an antibiotic treatment, the medications wouldn’t do their job.

What can we do?

First of all, we must be very responsible and conscious about how we treat our bodies, and how we heal them from illnesses.
So, to avoid unnecessary usage of antibiotics, always consult with your physician about your condition in order to receive adequate treatment!
Do not self-prescribe medications that could end up being harmful.
Discuss with your doctor the possibility of antibiotic resistance. Seek their advice for a more natural approach towards your issue instead of jumping right on antibiotics. In many cases of bacterial infections, there are non-invasive solutions, which do not include antibiotics.
For example, tonsillitis, but I will leave this broad topic for another time! 😉
In later articles I will share with you how to recover from an antibiotic treatment and how to boost your immune system in order to lower the bacteria’s chances of infecting your body!

Stay tuned!

 

Holistic living, personal development, physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health and wellbeing enthusiast.

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