Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe

This post contains affiliate links! You can read our full affiliate disclosure HERE.

The information I share in this blog is based on my personal experience, conclusions, observations and studies, or taken from books and educational materials, which are mentioned in the articles. I am not a medical professional, nor a health expert. Before implementing any of the information shared in this blog, consult with your physician or nutritionist!

Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe

probiotic beetroot kvass recipe

The beetroot kvass recipe is gathering more and more popularity among the Western people for its wonderful health benefits and exotic taste!

 This traditional Eastern European drink has been around for many years supplying its fans with probiotics, prebiotics, and essential minerals and electrolytes!

And today I would like to show you my version of this indispensable fermented drink recipe! Although it usually consists of just a couple of ingredients (beets, water, and salt), the different variations are endless since you can pretty much add all kinds of rhizomes, veggies, and spices (for example, beet kvass with ginger).

But first, is beet kvass a probiotic?

I would say “Hell, yeah!” Whether you use a starting culture or not, there is still a fermentation process going in which the beneficial bacteria absorb the sugar in the beets and transform it into acid (such as lactic or acetic acid). This increases the amounts of the good bacteria (probiotics) making beetroot kvass a super healthy gut friendly beverage!

How to make beet kvass?

 The traditional recipe without any additional yeast or a starter is very simple – you simply have to cut the beets in small pieces, mix them with some salt, and water and wait for a couple of days for the fermentation process to do its job.

Here, I am going to share a different recipe which I believe will make this gut friendly beverage even healthier and packed with probiotics!

My additions to the beet kvass recipe are Bulgarian yogurt starting culture (for more beneficial colon bacteria), and a couple of aromatic spices such as cinnamon and ground cloves! They will add more flavor and contribute to the amazing anti-inflammatory and liver boosting properties of the kvass!

Of course, as mentioned previously, this recipe can be tweaked endlessly! You can add some ginger root, turmeric, carrots, star anise, bay leaves, and sauerkraut juice instead of the starting culture.

Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe

Image source: Milica Vladova©

Just two important notes:

  1. Use as clean water as possible, for example spring water or filtered. I use a special charcoal filter pitcher which saves me a ton of money from buying water.
  2. Avoid using metal utensils in the process since they might harm the beneficial bacteria and slow (or stop) the fermentation. I like using some very simple wooden spoons for stirring the mixture!

When is beet kvass ready?

The kvass should be ready for a couple of days at normal room temperature. You can see some small bubbles forming at the of the liquid and the color of the kvass becoming dark ruby. The color of the beet chunks should also be naturally red and they should become much softer in texture. That’s when you know your kvass is ready but do not expect it to be too fizzy like the store bought carbonated soft drinks.

Can beet kvass go bad?

Yes, I think it can – if you leave it to ferment at the room temperature for too long it might start getting moldy and the beets will start getting very soft and dark in color.

Always keep an eye on your kvass, stir it regularly, and check for unnatural smells or mold, especially if you live in a hotter climate. In this case, your beetroot kvass may be ready much sooner! It is all about experimenting and tweaking as you go!

How much beet kvass should I drink?

The probiotic beetroot kvass may be a little exotic for the Western culture and for some it can be an acquired taste. But also keep in mind that beets are quite strong veggies and this beverage is packed with probiotics. For people with low levels of beneficial colon bacteria, probiotic drinks and foods may cause a bit of discomfort or “rumbling” at the beginning. So, start small with about 50 ml twice a day on an empty stomach. You can even dilute the substance with some water – sometimes the kvass may be a bit salty. See how you are doing and increase the quantity, if you desire. Always listen to your guts – pun intended! 😀

Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe

Image source: Milica Vladova©

Is beet kvass keto?

And the final point I would like to address is related to the very popular weight-loss and gut healing nutritional plan – the LCHF diet.

Many followers of the keto diet exclude beets from their menu due to its high amounts of natural sugars. But this is not the case with beetroot kvass. As mentioned previously, the fermentation process transforms the carbohydrates in the rhizomes into acetic acid which drastically decreases the amounts of net carbs in the end product. A similar process happens when making yogurt – the probiotics “consume” so to speak the carbs and turn them into lactic acid.

So, in my opinion, this probiotic healthy beverage is excellent for any weight loss diet plan such as the ketogenic nutritional plan.

But let’s see the numbers from Cronometer!

One 100 gram (100 ml) portion of beetroot kvass contains fewer than 1 gram net carbohydrates! Excellent!

Speaking of the keto diet, I have an upcoming book on healthy weight-loss using the low carb diet plan, specially designed for women. If you wish to be among the first to learn more is, feel free to subscribe to my newsletter and become an insider! You will get access to many cool freebies and special surprises!

Now, let’s get to the detailed recipe for kvass with probiotic starting culture!

Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe

Image source: Milica Vladova©

Print Recipe
Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe
Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe
Prep Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 5 days
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 5 days
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Probiotic Beet Kvass Recipe
Instructions
  1. First we need to prepare the salty water. Take 4 cups spring or filtered water and bring it boil. Add 2 Tbsps. salt (table salt, sea salt, or Himalayan) and stir well.
  2. When the salt dissolves completely, take the water off the heat, and leave it to cool down to about 45° C/ 113° F.
  3. Next, we can start preparing the fermented food. Peel the beetroots and cut them in medium cubes. Remember to use rubber gloves and an apron, because the red veggie stains a lot! Place the beetroot cubes in the jar.
  4. Next, add the probiotic, and pour some of the water in. Stir gently to distribute the Bulgarian yogurt culture evenly. Consecutively, you can fill the container with the saline. Cover the jar with the gauze and tighten it with a rubber band. The fabric will let the fermented food breath and prevent form bugs or dust entering the container.
  5. Leave the beetroot to soak in the saline for a couple of days in room temperature, and you can strain the mixture.
  6. Pour the red liquid back in the jar and seal it tightly with the lid. Store in the fridge and consume in small dosages daily.
Share this Recipe

Stay tuned!

Stay healthy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*